You Are Not Alone!

comments Comments Off on You Are Not Alone!
By , December 9, 2020 6:01 pm

222

12 years ago, I had a Melanoma skin cancer. Melanoma is not as painful as other type of cancer but it’s certainly as wicked, and it had to be removed. After the surgery, my doctor informed me that I’ll probably get the same cancer in 2 years, unless I’ll visit the hospital every day for the next 3 years and get Interferon injections. Read More…

Mesothelioma, mesothelioma cancer,mesothelioma attorneys,lawyers,malignant mesothelioma,symptoms,peritoneal mesothelioma,pleural,alimta,Asbestos,

12 years ago, I had a Melanoma skin cancer.

Melanoma is not as painful as other type of cancer but it’s certainly as wicked, and it had to be removed.

After the surgery, my doctor informed me that I’ll probably get the same cancer in 2 years, unless I’ll visit the hospital every day for the next 3 years and get Interferon injections.

I remember thinking to myself… “If I’ll follow doctor’s recommendations, it will make me be aware of the word “Cancer” every single day and would give it the power that this word doesn’t deserve.

I don’t recommend you to do the same, but regardless of my wife’s opinion,
I took a decision, not only to reject the treatments, but also to ignore the periodical medical surveillances.

Deep in my heart, I knew! That if God would decide to take my life then so be it…

Today, 12 years later, I am ignoring even the word “cholesterol” and stick to my insight that

Death is a part of life!

Accepting this insight alone changed my entire life.

To have the guts doing what I did, one must have a very strong belief.

For me it was more then a belief,

I Knew that every thing will be all right.

: ; : ; : ;

You are not alone‭!

Thank You,
And Good Luck With Your Journey!
Sincerely‭, Itzik Keidar‭

A Little About Prostate Cancer

comments Comments Off on A Little About Prostate Cancer
By , December 7, 2020 3:02 pm

310

Prostate cancer affects an estimated one out of every six males. Therefore it’s understandable that most men want to know at least something about prostate cancer, especially as they are approaching their 40s. This article is going to touch on some of the symptoms and treatments, as well as some of the side effects that come from prostate cancer and prostate cancer treatment. This article is not intended to be a substitution for your doctor’s advice, so make sure that you see…

Prostate cancer affects an estimated one out of every six males. Therefore it’s understandable that most men want to know at least something about prostate cancer, especially as they are approaching their 40s. This article is going to touch on some of the symptoms and treatments, as well as some of the side effects that come from prostate cancer and prostate cancer treatment. This article is not intended to be a substitution for your doctor’s advice, so make sure that you seek a professional opinion if you feel that you may have prostate cancer.

One thing that’s important to note is that you may not suffer any symptoms at all. That is why it’s very important to be checked for prostate cancer frequently, and especially more so as you get older because they can find the prostate cancer before any symptoms show up at all in most cases. Some men that have prostate cancer may experience some of the following symptoms. Frequent or difficult urination, as well as a weak urine flow, erectile dysfunction as well as painful ejaculation and blood in the urine or semen.

There are many different treatment options for prostate cancer and you will want to discuss these with your doctor or healthcare professional before any decision is made. A few of the choices are active surveillance, radiation or hormone therapy, chemotherapy or surgery. There are also other choices and as I said before you should discuss these with your doctor.

One of the best things that you can do for your prostate is to make sure you take care of it in the first place. This may reduce your risk of prostate cancer. Just knowing some simple things such as taking vitamin E, eating plenty of fruits and vegetables and being informed about eating fats and red meat can reduce your risk of prostate cancer.

Prostate Cancer ?Morality vs. Science

comments Comments Off on Prostate Cancer ?Morality vs. Science
By , December 5, 2020 12:22 pm

468

For illnesses like prostate cancer, morality is on the verge of being sent to the wayside in an effort to allow high risk individuals to be tested for the prostate cancer gene long before they reach the age in which prostate cancer will spring up within their bodies.

Prostate Health Morality, Prostate health Prevention, Prostate Health News, Prostate Helath, Prostate Cancer

With such widespread diseases as prostate and various other forms of cancer, there are concerns which eventually arise about the treatments and tests for such illnesses. Because such illnesses are so prevalent in developed countries, diseases like cancers and diabetes are widely studied by research institutions all over the world in hopes that there will be better cures and quicker tests to determine if someone has the illness or not. However, by developing such treatments, preventative measures and genetic tests, people fall into the problem of what constitutes morality. For illnesses like prostate cancer, morality is on the verge of being sent to the wayside in an effort to allow high risk individuals to be tested for the prostate cancer gene long before they reach the age in which prostate cancer will spring up within their bodies.

Perhaps the biggest debate over prostate cancer morality is whether or not scientists should develop early screening tests for the illness in high risk patients. Due to the extremely high genetic correlation between those affected by prostate cancer and the probability of their children getting the disease when they are older, a genetic test would be an excellent way to help people realize if they will have prostate cancer in the future or not.

Unfortunately for the technologies which could ultimately screen for prostate cancer, morality soon enters the debate. If people find out when they are young that they will have a high risk for prostate cancer at age sixty or so, they may have a slightly traumatic experience growing up and feeling that they will die at around age sixty ?especially if there is no cure for prostate cancer by that time. Furthermore, they would have difficulty finding health insurance ?as no self respecting insurance agency will want to insure a person who will be catching a costly disease at age sixty. These are two major concerns from a point of prostate cancer morality.

On the opposite side of the argument, however, people who say that prostate cancer morality should take a back seat to scientific advancement proclaim the benefits of early genetic testing. People should be aware of the status of their health. If more people were to receive blood tests to determine if they are at risk for prostate cancer, they would go get more prostate exams which would in turn lower the mortality rate for prostate cancer. After all, it is pretty difficult for those who support prostate cancer morality to argue against less people dying.

The whole battle between prostate cancer morality and the necessary science to help cure people will certainly turn into a raging debate in the future. Ultimately, the outcome will determine how well we handle other emerging diseases and whether or not we will do whatever it takes to combat them.

Perminant Progressive MS (Multiple Sclerosis) One Victim’s Dated Report

comments Comments Off on Perminant Progressive MS (Multiple Sclerosis) One Victim’s Dated Report
By , December 3, 2020 9:51 am

605

When I went from a cane to a four wheel walker ~with a seat ~ people’s stress levels dropped dramaticly. I fell down a lot less too. My handicapped, motorized scooter had long since been dispensed with when I had left real estate and had decided I wouldn’t need it. Now, I have another. Now, I have a hard time getting out of the wheelchair onto it. So, is this what is meant by “Progressive?”

Hebrews 11:1, Perminant Progressive MS,Multiple Sclerosis,denial,delayed,acceptance,diagnosis,my fear,stampeded me,stupid decisions,MSers,disposable briefs,writing a novel,Russ Miles,dispel depression

Labor Day ~ 2005

When, a couple of years ago, I wrote an article about my dread disease, I still had not fully comprehended how disabling Perminant Progressive MS can become. I had come to realize that my denial had delayed acceptance of the diagnosis, my fear had stampeded me to stupid decisions, and had found ~ by writing a novel ~ I could dispel depression. Yet, I could still walk, a little, and figured I would bounce back soon.

Reality catches up with most of us ~ sooner or later. Not that it is easy to accept. Although the ‘Docs?said I had already passed from relapsing remitting MS ~ to Perminant Progressive MS ~ I thought I’d make a rather rapid comeback. Little did I know that I would become even more dependent upon another who deserved less defiance from one she had committed to share life with.

When I went from a cane to a four wheel walker ~with a seat ~ her stress level dropped dramaticly. I fell down a lot less too. My handicapped, motorized scooter had long since been dispensed with when I had left real estate and had decided I wouldn’t need it. Now, I have another. Now, I have a hard time getting out of the wheelchair onto it.

Perminant Progressive MS (Multiple Sclerosis) it’s called. “Progressive?has surely taken on more meaning ~as I can no longer walk ~ even with the walker. Accepting life in a wheelchair is a tough one. So is accepting the fact that keeping honeybees for BVT (Bee Venom Therapy) is not a realistic option for those of us that must now reside in apartments. “Perminant?is still not a diagnosis or concept that I am willing to accept.

Maybe, admitting to myself that I needed to use disposable briefs was the most major challenge? My caregiver’s sensitivity to provide a sightly container ~ rather than stack my diapers in a conspicious place (like on the back of the toilet) ~ has made my right decision less embarrassing. Her rapid removal of soiled disposables helps too.

Like most of us MSers, I continue to seek the “Silver Bullet,?that non-traditional cure that conventional medicine ~ which says there is none ~ doesn’t embrace. Okay, I have tried a few. Although some other MS victims have experienced significant improvements from these, Silver water, LDN, and various supplements, they haven’t worked for me. There are many weapons in the arsenal that I have yet to try.

Perhaps, my best weapon is faith? As Hebrews 11:1 says, “Faith is the substance of things hoped for, the evidence of things not yet seen,?I continue to keep on hoping I am led to the answer of renewed health for myself. I also believe that I am where a very good God wants me to be ~ for His reasons.

If you have found my article because there is something in it you were supposed to see, I am delighted to have been of some small service. You might want to visit the website I am learning to build and attempt to maintain http://MilesBooks.com where other information awaits you.

To those of you who are affected by others with Multiple Sclerosis, I ask that you be patient with him or her. Pray for us. Hope we become more sensitive to how our compromised conditions impacts others ~ and that we make internal adjustments which will will be reflected in our outward actions.

For those who have Perminant Progressive MS, expect challenges. Accept ~ without resentment ~ the helps and aids which are made available. Become less of a problem for those who attempt to help you.

Different Forms of Acute Leukemia

comments Comments Off on Different Forms of Acute Leukemia
By , December 1, 2020 6:42 am

447

Leukemia is a disease of the bone marrow and blood that is known to affect normal blood cell

childhood leukemia, acute leukemia

Leukemia is a disease of the bone marrow and blood that is known to affect normal blood cell production. Normal blood cells have a limited period of life and they need to be constantly replaced by fresh, young cells to carry on their activity. There is a type of cell within the bone marrow (stem cell) that matures into the type of blood cells that the body needs. In normal condition, these stem cells develop either into red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets, into a controlled way. Leukemia perturbs the normal development of blood cells and causes the accumulation of partially developed cells, that aren’t able to fulfill their role inside the organism.

Judging by the speed of development and the persistence of the disorder, there are two types of leukemia: acute leukemia and chronic leukemia. Judging by the types of stem cells affected by the disorder, leukemia can either be lymphocytic or myelogenous.

Acute leukemia differs from chronic leukemia by the levels that stem cells are able to reach in their development (stem cells that present anomalies still manage to partially develop and either resemble immature cells or complete, normal white blood cells).

Inside the body of people who suffer from acute leukemia of myelogenous, the bone marrow produces stem cells which form a kind of partially matured white blood cell called myeloblast. This type of blood cell doesn’t reach a full maturity state and can’t carry out its intended role. Myelogenous cells tend to multiply very fast and exceed the numbers of healthy blood cells, facilitating the occurrence of anemia, infections and weakening the immune system of the body. The diseased cells can also spread to other places of the organism, such as organs.

As statistics indicate, there are lots of annual cases of the disease, acute leukemia of myelogenous form being the most common type of leukemia. Although the disease is known to regress quickly when the appropriate treatment is administered, if left untreated it may cause the death of the affected person. This form of leukemia tends to recidivate and it can redevelop with time.

Regardless of age and sex, many people are diagnosed with forms of leukemia. Children tend to respond better to some types of leukemia, while adults difficultly cope with the disease. The cases of acute leukemia exceed those of chronic leukemia by approximately 10 percent. Older adults seem to be affected the most by acute leukemia. Around two thirds of acute leukemia cases seem to occur after the age of 60. Leukemia is a serious form of cancer and it needs immediate treatment. If treated correctly, especially in its incipient stages, leukemia can be successfully overcome.

Panorama Theme by Themocracy