Adult Attention Deficit Disorder

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Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is usually identifiable in early stages of childhood. There are instances when the disorder continues until adulthood if treatment is not prompt or effective. This is known as Adult Attention Deficit Disorder (AADD). The impact of AADD is severe compared to ADD because as an adult, coping strategies are required to a greater extent with regard to disorganization and other symptoms of the syndrome. The visible signs and symptoms of the disorder in adults are as below:

Attention Deficit Disorder, Adult Attention Deficit Disorder, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Attention Deficit Disorder Tests

Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) is usually identifiable in early stages of childhood. There are instances when the disorder continues until adulthood if treatment is not prompt or effective. This is known as Adult Attention Deficit Disorder (AADD). The impact of AADD is severe compared to ADD because as an adult, coping strategies are required to a greater extent with regard to disorganization and other symptoms of the syndrome. The visible signs and symptoms of the disorder in adults are as below:

Impulsiveness. ADD adults have difficulties handling their impulsiveness. Sudden bouts of anger, impulsive spending, butting into conversations, and breaking relationships are all side effects of impulsiveness. This in turn leads to lack of cordial atmosphere and feelings of regret at later stages.

A high level of distraction. The ADD adult is always thinking of a myriad subjects and incidents that leave him/her unfocused and distracted. Apart from this, external stimuli introduce further distraction to the overactive mental process. When the adult leaves home and mixes with the society, he/she is bombarded with words, visuals, and noises that disturb and irritate.

Anxiety and lack of focus. Since the patient is also on the thinking track, there is tendency to do the task at hand with lesser concentration. This leaves them confused as to why mistakes occur in their work or why they leave their work half-completed. The patient resorts to writing important things in hand notes or schedulers.

Impatience. Just like children with ADD, adults too are fidgety with staying put in one place. They are always taking in things, keeping their hands busy, or keeping engaged in multiple activities. This tends to make them feel exhausted at times.

Socializing problems. Making friends, retaining relationships, caring for family members, and working co-operatively with colleagues are a strain for ADD adults due to their impatience and impulsiveness. This further brings down trust levels.

Lack of planning and disorganization. It is difficult for ADD adults to comprehend instructions, work procedures, do time estimates, and complete work within deadlines. They are unable to chalk out tasks involved in an activity and estimate the time likely to be taken for completing each task. This issue is the result of all the factors discussed above.

Memory problems. Short term memory loss is a hurdle for ADD adults that leads them to forget the task at hand or instructions given only a little while before. Their mind tends to jump from though to another in a matter of minutes, leaving them with no idea of the real situation.

Several strategies such as maintaining reminders in mobile phones, keeping notes in calendars and schedulers, attending skill-developing sessions, and deploying pneumonic to remember things would help these adults lead a comparatively normal life.

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Alcohol and Cancer: Understanding the Connection

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Research has shown that risks for cancer increase among men who have two alcoholic drinks a day and women who have one alcoholic drink per day. While everyone has been widely aware of the fact that smoking cigarettes greatly increase your risk of contracting cancer, there has been very little publicity of the fact that alcohol can act as a similar carcinogen.

Cancer, Avoiding Cancer, Health, Alternative health Preventing Cancer, Cancer Remission, Chemotherapy, Healing Cancer, Cancer health articles

Research has shown that risks for cancer increase among men who have two alcoholic drinks a day and women who have one alcoholic drink per day. While everyone has been widely aware of the fact that smoking cigarettes greatly increase your risk of contracting cancer, there has been very little publicity of the fact that alcohol can act as a similar carcinogen.

By its very nature and design, the consumption of alcohol damages cells in your body. This damage can easily promote cell division, stimulate enzymes which cause the activation of other carcinogens and destroy certain nutrients that act as natural preventatives to cancer.

Most of the research indicates that a strong link exists between alcohol and cancers of the esophagus, pharynx and mouth. There is a suggested, those less strongly proven, link between cancers of the liver, breast and colon.

According to the American Cancer Society, oral cancers are six times more common in alcohol users than in non alcohol users.

Obviously, all of this evidence points to the conclusion that you should avoid alcohol so you can lower your chances of contracting these types of cancer.

For most people the question then comes down to a simple decision: are the benefits of drinking alcohol larger than the potential deficits of cancer? As long as the mythology continues that there is no cure for cancer, the question should be fairly simple to answer. Very few people would happily enjoy a few nights out with friends drinking for months or years of painful cancer.

Put plainly, our bodies are designed to heal themselves. Our immune system was created to keep our bodies healthy. However, like any other worker, our immune system cannot do its work if we don’t give it the necessary tools.

One of the effects of alcohol, which isn’t one of the reasons most folks drink it, is that it reduces the ability of your immune system to do its job. So, people who regularly drink alcohol are regularly inhibiting the ability of their immune system to do its job.

Our cells are constantly dividing and there are a large number of ways the cell can become malignant. In reality, we probably develop malignant cells on a daily basis. However, once they become known to our immune system as a threat, they are destroyed.

It’s only when our immune system somehow misses the indications that a cell is becoming a problem that we term it cancer.

There is no dispute about the fact that doing anything which will inhibit our immune system increases our chances for becoming ill. It’s significantly odd, then, that we all continue going about our lives while continually doing things that inhibit our immune systems.

In the end, we all need to evaluate the actions we take and the decisions we make with an eye towards the potential rewards versus the potential risks. Alcohol diminishes the immune system and a diminished immune system greatly elevates our chances of developing cancer. Next time you start to drink alcohol, stop and ask your immune system if it really wants to get drunk.

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Alcoholism?What Should I Know About It?

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What is alcoholism?

Alcoholism is a disease that affects the part of the brain that controls your feelings, the way you make decisions, and the way you act. People with alcoholism cannot control how much they drink. What causes alcoholism?

Nobody knows what causes alcoholism. People with parents who have alcoholism have a greater chance of getting the disease. Alcoholism may be related to the things we learn when we are growing up. Alcoholism is not caused by a lack o…

alcohol

What is alcoholism?

Alcoholism is a disease that affects the part of the brain that controls your feelings, the way you make decisions, and the way you act. People with alcoholism cannot control how much they drink. What causes alcoholism?

Nobody knows what causes alcoholism. People with parents who have alcoholism have a greater chance of getting the disease. Alcoholism may be related to the things we learn when we are growing up. Alcoholism is not caused by a lack of will power or moral values.

How can I tell if I have alcoholism?

It is not easy to tell if you have alcoholism. You might drink socially at first, but over time the drinking can get out of control. Your family, friends, or doctor might notice it before you do. You might drink to help yourself go to sleep or deal with stress and anxiety. Over time, you need to drink more to feel the same way. As the drinking gets worse, you may have some of the following:

* Stomach ulcers

* Liver disease

* Mood problems, such as depression and irritability

* Trouble sleeping

* Problems with family and friends

* Problems at work.

You might have alcoholism if you have tried to quit drinking but were not able to stop. Alcoholism can make you do things you wouldn’t do if you were sober. Some of these things can hurt other people, even the people you love.

Where can I get help for alcoholism?

Your doctor can help you find the right treatment program. You also can check with your health insurance company. Some insurance plans cover alcohol treatment only at certain places.

If you have been a heavy drinker for a long time, do not stop drinking suddenly. This can lead to serious withdrawal symptoms. What is withdrawal?

When you stop drinking, your body might find it hard with no alcohol. You might have some uncomfortable feelings. That is called withdrawal. You might feel anxious and confused or have trouble sleeping. If you get “the shakes” when you don’t drink, or if you feel like you need to have a drink early in the day, you might need to take medicine when you stop drinking to help with the withdrawal. This is called detoxification (say:dee-tox-uh-fuh-kay-shun, or “detox,” for short).

How can my doctor tell if I need detoxification?

Your doctor will ask you questions to see if you need to take medicine to stop drinking. It is important to be honest with your doctor about how much you drink and the kinds of drugs you take.

Can detoxification be done at home?

Yes, but only with close supervision from your doctor. You will need to have another person at home to help you take your medicine. If you have serious withdrawal symptoms or other medical problems, you might have to go to a hospital for detoxification. Tell your doctor if you had a seizure or got delirious when you tried to stop drinking before.

What happens after detoxification?

Detoxification is not enough to treat alcoholism. You should have counseling before and after detoxification. Counseling will help keep you from drinking again.

What about Alcoholics Anonymous?

Alcoholics Anonymous, or “A.A.,” is a free support group for people with alcoholism. The people in A.A. help each other stay sober. Most communities have A.A. meetings, and most alcohol treatment programs tell their patients to go to these meetings.

Where can I get more information?

Your doctor

This information provides a general overview and may not apply to everyone. Talk to your family doctor to find out if this information applies to you and to get more information on this subject.

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After Cancer Treatment:Health Tips Everyone Needs To Know

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If you or someone you know has a history of cancer, it is important to be aware of the potential health consequences from cancer and its treatment.

After Cancer Treatment:Health Tips Everyone Needs To Know

If you or someone you know has a history of cancer, it is important to be aware of the potential health consequences from cancer and its treatment. Frequently, patients and families are not informed or do not recall discussions that occurred during the stress-filled days after diagnosis about such potential problems as pain, depression, infertility and other physical and emotional changes. Regardless of whether problems are temporary or permanent, most can be managed.

To begin to address the many and varied health-related needs of long-term cancer survivors, the American Journal of Nursing (AJN) recently released a report, based on a July 2005 symposium, that offers action strategies and recommendations.

“The late effects of cancer and treatment for survivors diagnosed as adults remain poorly documented,” said Pamela J. Haylock, MA, RN, symposium co-director, cancer care consultant and doctoral student at the University of Texas Medical Branch School of Nursing in Galveston, TX. “Yet up to 75 percent of survivors have some health deficits related to their cancers and therapies. Knowing about potential risks and learning and using risk reduction strategies are important steps in survivors’ recovery.”

Nurses recommend that cancer survivors heed the following advice:

• Incorporate regular exercise, stress management, a healthful diet and weight control as part of a healthy lifestyle.

• Schedule regular health checkups.

• Ask your oncology team for a written summary of your cancer diagnosis, treatments, tests and recommended follow-up once treatment is complete. Create a folder to organize diagnostic and laboratory reports, and give it to your current health care provider to make a copy for his or her records.

• Ask your nurse or physician to help you and your caregivers learn about possible long-term effects of your cancer therapy and ways to prevent or minimize them. Effects differ from person to person; therefore, educating yourself is important.

• Inform physicians and nurses about your previous cancer history, treatment, current medications and long-term effects you may experience, including infertility, early menopause, indigestion, dry mouth or taste changes, constipation, diarrhea, sleep issues, fatigue, dry skin, memory loss, changes in thinking, vision or hearing problems, depression, relationship/sexuality issues, anxiety, confidence issues, pain, tingling, or numbness or swelling in the fingers and toes.

• Look for resources to assist with any physical, emotional or financial issues that you may experience.

Helpful Internet sites are www.acor.org, www.cancer.org, and www.canceradvocacy.org.

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Alcoholism Stages – 3 Stages Of Alcoholism You Should Know

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Alcoholism stages can be categorized into three stages of alcoholism – early stage, middle stage and end stage alcoholism or late stage alcoholism. Alcoholism stages generally take years to develop. Alcoholism is a disease where alcoholic beverage consumption is at a level that interferes with physical or mental health, and negatively impacts social, family or occupational responsibilities.

Consuming no more than one or two drinks per day for healthy men and a drink a day …

alcoholism stages,stages of alcoholism,alcohol abuse,alcoholism,alcoholism disease,alcohol,

Alcoholism stages can be categorized into three stages of alcoholism – early stage, middle stage and end stage alcoholism or late stage alcoholism. Alcoholism stages generally take years to develop. Alcoholism is a disease where alcoholic beverage consumption is at a level that interferes with physical or mental health, and negatively impacts social, family or occupational responsibilities.

Consuming no more than one or two drinks per day for healthy men and a drink a day for healthy non-pregnant women are generally considered acceptable alcohol consumption without health risks. However, as the amount or frequency of drinking increases, the earliest of the alcoholism stages can develop as a result.

Early Stages of Alcoholism

In the early alcoholism stages, a person begins to depend on alcohol to affect their mood. They drink for relief from problems, and they begin thinking more and more about alcohol. The person and others around them may not recognize that they are in the earliest of the stages of alcoholism. A gradual increase in tolerance happens, meaning, it takes increasing amounts of alcohol to achieve the desired mood-altering effects. Often, the person can consume large amounts of alcohol without appearing impaired.

At the early alcoholism stages, the body has adapted to increasing amounts of alcohol. In fact, how a person functions will likely be improved with drinking as blood alcohol levels rise. For example, they can think and talk normally or walk a straight line with no problem. However, with continued alcohol consumption over time, the body begins to lose its ability to deal with high alcohol levels. As this occurs, when the alcoholic stops drinking and their blood alcohol level decreases, their thinking, talking or walking functions deteriorate, and they are moving into the next of the stages of alcoholism.

Middle Alcoholism Stages

The need and desire to drink gradually becomes more intense. Drinking larger amounts and more often happens as well as drinking earlier in the day. The alcoholic is losing control over drinking, and the body is losing its ability to process alcohol like it did in the early stages of alcoholism. Their tolerance decreases as they become intoxicated more easily. Withdrawal symptoms begin to become more severe if alcohol is reduced.

The person may now secretly recognize there is a drinking problem, and others may begin to notice as well. Unfortunately, the alcoholic no longer can judge how much alcohol their body can handle. Typically, the drinker denies to themselves and others that alcohol is a problem so they won’t have to deal with their inner turmoil. Hangovers, blackouts and stomach problems can now be physical symptoms that occur on a regular basis.

End Stage Alcoholism

As alcoholism progresses, the alcoholic has become obsessed with drinking to the exclusion of nearly everything else. Everyone can tell there’s a major problem. During the late alcoholism stages, the mental and physical health of the alcoholic are seriously deteriorating. Many of the body’s organs have been damaged which lowers resistance to disease. Relationships at home or socially may have been severely damaged, and there can be mounting financial and legal problems due to the alcoholic’s powerlessness over alcohol.

Every alcoholic will suffer from malnutrition. Alcohol in large amounts interferes with the digestion process and the passage of nutrients from the intestines into the bloodstream. Liver function has been damaged, further limiting the conversion of nutrients into a usable form that the body can assimilate. The damaged cells are not receiving the needed nutrients, they cannot repair themselves and the damage continues. Nutritional deficiencies cause a host of related problems to become worse. For example, a vitamin B-1 deficiency common in alcoholics can result in loss of mental alertness and appetite, fatigue, confusion and emotional instability.

And if the alcoholic continues drinking, alcohol will cause the death of the alcoholic in one way or another. From suicide, accidents and related injuries to direct damage to the body’s organs and systems, death will likely be the final outcome of end stage alcoholism.

Are there warning signs of alcoholism? Yes! Understand the signs and symptoms that indicate that alcohol consumption is becoming or is already a problem. There are resources available in a variety of ways to help deal with alcoholism stages and the serious consequences of this disease.

Copyright 2006 InfoSearch Publishing

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An Innovative Treatment For Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

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Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a slow-growing, life-threatening cancer of the immune system that develops when white blood cells grow uncontrollably in the lymph nodes.

An Innovative Treatment For Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is a slow-growing, life-threatening cancer of the immune system that develops when white blood cells grow uncontrollably in the lymph nodes. Each year in the U.S. alone, 55,000 new cases are diagnosed. Fortunately, novel, highly personalized treatments are being produced. With a recent medical breakthrough, patients can now receive individualized treatment that kills cancerous cells while sparing normal, healthy cells.

Traditional treatments usually consist of chemotherapy and monoclonal antibody drugs, which, along with targeting cancerous B-cells, kill healthy white blood cells that comprise a major component of the immune system.

Biovest International is one of a few companies working on patient-specific cancer vaccines. Biovest’s personalized therapeutic, BiovaxID, is currently being tested as a treatment for indolent (slow-growing) follicular B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which affects 12,500 new patients in the U.S. each year. The vaccine could eventually be used to treat other cancers.

Personalizing BiovaxID begins with a sampling of cancerous cells from a patient’s lymph nodes. On the surface of these cells are unique proteins, or antigens, detectable by the immune system. The doctor sends this sample of the patient’s cancer cells to Biovest’s laboratory in Worcester, Mass. Here, researchers mix the cells with another line of cells licensed from Stanford University. The cells fuse, releasing the antigen proteins.

As the patient undergoes chemotherapy to kill most of the cancer cells, Biovest collects and purifies the patient’s antigen proteins, which, after chemical modification, form the active ingredient of the custom vaccine. The individualized vaccine is then sent back to the doctor, who injects it into the patient five times over six months.

“Typical treatments for non-Hodgkin’s do not specifically target the tumor,” explains Dr. Carl M. Cohen, Biovest Chief Operating Officer. “Our vaccine trains the patient’s immune system to target a specific protein on the tumor cells-one found only on the tumor cells. BiovaxID only kills cancer cells. If you think of chemotherapy as a blunt instrument, our treatment is like tweezers.”

Results from a Biovest study of 20 patients, begun at the National Cancer Institute a decade ago, show a 95 percent survival rate. Forty-five percent are still in remission. According to historical data, only about half the patients would have survived with conventional treatments. None would still be in remission. (The Biovest-treated patients remained disease-free for a median of eight years.)

Currently, Biovest is enrolling patients for a large-scale study to be held at several major U.S. and European medical institutions. The trial will include 460 patients. Company officials hope to obtain FDA approval for the vaccine by 2008.

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